Scenes from Fire Prevention Week 2014

Lake Dillon firefighters and staff have been visiting the four elementary schools in our district to teach kids about fire safety. It’s been a hoot!

 

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Firefighter/medic Jon Hannum talks with pre-school kids about good fire and bad fire. Campfires … marshmallows … good … yum!

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Stop, drop and roll!

 

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Job well done!

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Gotta knock down all of the windows with fire in them!

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Ready, fire … um … aim!

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You forgot something …

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Firefighter Steven Wantuck advises fifth-graders in the fine art of rolling hose.

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A perfect fit!

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Carrying an air tank like a boss!

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I’ll grow into this, I promise!

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Good thing the suspenders keep the pants from falling down.

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Um, I don’t think it’s supposed to look like that.

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Let me help you put the eye visors down.

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Am totally going to wear one of these when I grow up!

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Firefighter/medic Case Byle hanging out with the kiddos.

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Getting some love!




Fire Prevention Week 2013

Parents, teachers and students:

National Fire Prevention Week is scheduled for Oct. 6-12, 2013. In observation, Lake Dillon Fire-Rescue firefighters and fire-prevention staff members will be visiting each elementary-school class in the district during the first two weeks of October to talk about fire safety.

This year’s theme is “Prevent kitchen fires,” spreading the word that more fires start in the kitchen than in any other part of the home—and we’ll help teach people how to keep cooking fires from starting in the first place.

Please take some time to review these informative pages and fire-safety tips:

Also, click on the following links for more information:




Fire Prevention Week 2013 for teachers

Teachers: Below you’ll find the lesson plans and state educational standards that apply to Fire Prevention Week activities. Please don’t hesitate to contact LDFR Public Information Officer Steve Lipsher at (970) 262-5209 if you have any questions.

Lesson plans

State educational standards

Web Resources




Fire safety for parents …

Dear parents:

Keeping your children and yourselves safe is our top priority at Lake Dillon Fire-Rescue. Each October, our firefighters and fire-prevention experts visit all of the elementary-school classes in our district to talk about fire safety and to ensure that your children know what to do in case of a fire.

To take a peek at what we’re discussing with your children in the schools, please see Fire Safety Week 2012 for Teachers. We encourage you to practice these lessons at home, discuss fire safety with your children routinely and practice fire drills so that your children know at least two ways to get out of each room in the house and where to go and whom to contact in case of an emergency.

For more information on how you can teach fire safety to your kids, please see:

 




Fire Safety Week 2013 activities for kids

Hey, kids! Learn more about fire safety and how you can keep yourself and your family safe and happy with these fun Fire Prevention Week activities!




Fire facts for Fire Prevention Week

Home Fires

  • One home structure fire was reported every 85 seconds in 2010.
  • Most fatal fires kill one or two people.  In 2010, 19 home fires killed five or more people. These 19 fires resulted in 101 deaths.
  • In 2010, U.S. fire departments responded to 369,500 home structure fires. These fires caused 13,350 civilian injuries, 2,640 civilian deaths, and $6.9 billion in direct damage.

Escape planningEscape Planning

  • According to an NFPA survey, only one-third of Americans have both developed and practiced a home fire escape plan.
  • Almost three-quarters of Americans do have an escape plan; however, less than half actually practiced it.
  • One-third of Americans households who made and estimate they thought they would have at least 6 minutes before a fire in their home would become life threatening. The time available is often less. And only 8% said their first thought on hearing a smoke alarm would be to get out! Smoke Alarms
  • Almost two-thirds (62%) of reported home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
  • Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in reported home fires in half.
  • In fires considered large enough to activate the smoke alarm, hardwired alarms operated 92% of the time, while battery powered alarms operated only 77%  of the time.

Cooking

  • Cooking has been the leading cause of reported home fires and home fire injuries since 1990. Unattended cooking was by far the leading cause of these fires; Two-thirds of home cooking  fires began with ignition of cooking materials, including food, cooking oil, fat, or grease .
  • Cooking caused two of every five (42%)  of reported home fires, roughly one of every seven  (15% ) home fire deaths, and two of every five (37% ) home fire injuries, and 11% of direct property damage from home fires in 2010.
  • Ranges accounted for the 58% of home cooking fire incidents. Ovens accounted for 16%.
  • Children under five face a higher risk of non-fire burns associated with cooking than being burned in a cooking fire.
  • 90% of burns associated with cooking equipment resulted from contact with hot equipment or some other non-fire source.

Space heaterHeating

  • Heating equipment was the leading cause of reported home fires in the 1980s and has generally ranked second since them.  It is the second leading cause of home fire deaths. Fires involving heating equipment peak in December, January and February, as do deaths from these fires.
  • The leading factor contributing to heating equipment fires was failure to clean, principally creosote from solid fueled heating equipment, primarily chimneys.
  • Portable or fixed space heaters, including wood stoves, were involved in one-third (32%) of home heating fires and four out of five (79%) home heating deaths.
  • Half of home heating fire deaths resulted from fires caused by heating equipment too close to things that can burn, such as upholstered furniture, clothing, mattresses or bedding.

Smoking Materials

  • In 2010, smoking materials started and estimated 17,500 home structure fires, resulting in 540 deaths, 1,320 injuries and $535 million in direct property damage. Smoking materials are the leading cause of home fire deaths.
  • Sleep was a factor in two of every five home smoking material fire deaths. Possible alcohol impairment was reported in one quarter of these deaths.
  • In recent years, Canada and the United States have required that all cigarettes sold must be “fire safe,” that is have reduced ignition strength and less likely to start fires.

Electrical outletElectrical

  • Half  (49%) of home electrical fires involved electrical distribution or lighting equipment. Other leading types of equipment were washer or dryer, fan, portable or stationary space heater, air conditioning equipment, water heater and range.
  • In 2010, electrical failures or malfunctions were factors in an estimated 46,500 home structure fires resulting in 420 deaths, 1,520 injuries and $1.5 billion in property damage.

Candles

  • On average, there are 35 home candle fires reported per day.
  • More than one-third of these fires started in the bedroom.
  • More than half of all candle fires start when things that can burn are too close to the candle.
  • In 2010, candles caused 3% of home fires, 4% of home fire deaths, 6% of home fire injuries and 5% of direct property damage from home fires.

Home Fire Sprinklers

  • Automatic fire sprinkler systems cut the risk of dying in a home fire by about 83%.
  • Home fire sprinklers can contain and may even extinguish a fire in less time than it would take the fire department to arrive on the scene.
  • Sprinklers are highly effective because they react so quickly in a fire. They reduce the risk of death or injury from a fire because they dramatically reduce the heat, flames and smoke produced, allowing people time to evacuate the home.



History of Fire Prevention Week

Commemorating a conflagration Fire Prevention Week was established to commemorate the Great Chicago Fire, the tragic 1871 conflagration that killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures and burned more than 2,000 acres. The fire began on October 8, but continued into and did most of its damage on October 9, 1871.

According to popular legend, the fire broke out after a cow – belonging to Mrs. Catherine O’Leary – kicked over a lamp, setting first the barn, then the whole city on fire. Chances are you’ve heard some version of this story yourself; people have been blaming the Great Chicago Fire on the cow and Mrs. O’Leary, for more than 130 years. But recent research by Chicago historian Robert Cromie has helped to debunk this version of events.

The ‘Moo’ myth Like any good story, the ‘case of the cow’ has some truth to it. The great fire almost certainly started near the barn where Mrs. O’Leary kept her five milking cows. But there is no proof that O’Leary was in the barn when the fire broke out – or that a jumpy cow sparked the blaze. Mrs. O’Leary herself swore that she’d been in bed early that night, and that the cows were also tucked in for the evening.

But if a cow wasn’t to blame for the huge fire, what was? Over the years, journalists and historians have offered plenty of theories. Some blamed the blaze on a couple of neighborhood boys who were near the barn sneaking cigarettes. Others believed that a neighbor of the O’Leary’s may have started the fire. Some people have speculated that a fiery meteorite may have fallen to earth on October 8, starting several fires that day – in Michigan and Wisconsin, as well as in Chicago.

The biggest blaze that week While the Great Chicago Fire was the best-known blaze to start during this fiery two-day stretch, it wasn’t the biggest. That distinction goes to the Peshtigo Fire, the most devastating forest fire in American history. The fire, which also occurred on October 8th, 1871, and roared through Northeast Wisconsin, burning down 16 towns, killing 1,152 people, and scorching 1.2 million acres before it ended.

Historical accounts of the fire say that the blaze began when several railroad workers clearing land for tracks unintentionally started a brush fire. Before long, the fast-moving flames were whipping through the area ‘like a tornado,’ some survivors said. It was the small town of Peshtigo, Wisconsin that suffered the worst damage. Within an hour, the entire town had been destroyed.

Eight decades of fire prevention Those who survived the Chicago and Peshtigo fires never forgot what they’d been through; both blazes produced countless tales of bravery and heroism. But the fires also changed the way that firefighters and public officials thought about fire safety. On the 40th anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire, the Fire Marshals Association of North America (today known as the International Fire Marshals Association), decided that the anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire should henceforth be observed not with festivities, but in a way that would keep the public informed about the importance of fire prevention.  The commemoration grew incrementally official over the years.

In 1920, President Woodrow Wilson issued the first National Fire Prevention Day proclamation, and since 1922, Fire Prevention Week has been observed on the Sunday through Saturday period in which October 9 falls. According to the National Archives and Records Administration’s Library Information Center, Fire Prevention Week is the longest running public health and safety observance on record. The President of the United States has signed a proclamation proclaiming a national observance during that week every year since 1925.