Press release: Firefighters encourage residents to “adopt a hydrant”

SummitFireLogosFeature

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Contact: Steve Lipsher, Public Information Officer

Office: (970) 262-5209

 

 

20 January 2014

 

Firefighters encourage residents to “adopt a hydrant”

With all of the recent snowfall turning Summit County into its usual skier’s paradise, local firefighters are asking residents to “adopt a fire hydrant” and dig it out for access in case of a fire.

 

Copper Mountain Fire, Lake Dillon Fire-Rescue and Red, White & Blue Fire personnel have been clearing snow away from hydrants as time permits, but with hundreds of hydrants throughout Summit County, the task is gargantuan, and help from our neighbors is needed.

 

“In case of a fire, when minutes can mean the difference in saving a structure – or a life – being able to get to water is critical,” said Lake Dillon Chief Dave Parmley. “Digging out a hydrant during an emergency takes valuable time that we might not have.”

 

Jay Nelson, the deputy chief of Red, White & Blue Fire, suggested that residents should consider a hydrant closest to their home as a lifeline, requiring the simple maintenance of digging away snow left by natural accumulation and snowplows.

 

“The abundant snow is one of the reasons many of us have chosen to live here,” said Copper Mountain Fire Chief Dan Moroz. “But it definitely can pose an obstacle to firefighters getting to a hydrant quickly. Helping us in keeping hydrants clear helps everybody in the event of a fire.”

 

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Lake Dillon firefighters Doug Beeler, left, and Lou Laurina dig out a fire hydrant in Frisco this week. Summit County’s firefighters appreciate any help in clearing snow from hydrants to ensure easy and quick access in case of a fire. Credit: Lake Dillon Fire-Rescue

Lake Dillon firefighters Doug Beeler, left, and Lou Laurina dig out a fire hydrant in Frisco this week. Summit County’s firefighters appreciate any help in clearing snow from hydrants to ensure easy and quick access in case of a fire. Credit: Lake Dillon Fire-Rescue

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